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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
from top national security officials about the nsa surveillance program, including questions about spying on u.s. allies. span 3 and c-on c- span.org at 1:30 p.m. eastern time. ban -- willt may stay on the nsa story and get your thoughts, should congress endorse or stop using intelligence efforts? the phone lines -- send us a tweet as well or post your comments on facebook.com/c- span. you can also e-mail us, journal@c-span.org. the may begin with the front page of "the financial times" this morning. this is their headline -- here is part of her statement that she put out -- "wall street journal" also with a story on their front page -- "the new york times closed code this morning -- -- "the new york times" this morning. then there is this in "the washington post" this morning -- we turn to you, should congress endorse or stop these programs? caller. is democratic i think the congress should take some kind of action to tighten the reins on the nsa since 9/11 and the passing of the patriot act. it has grown exponentially. it's out of control. i am hoping the congress will tighten th
"lemonde" reported the nsa was monitoring more than 70 million phone calls of french citizens. over one 30-day period from december to january, tens of millions of french phone calls were collected. then today, a similar revelation published in "el mundo" in spain, about 60 million phone calls being monitored in that country. you see this revelation between the prism of reporter glenn greenwald, who is behind both stories, thanks to his source, former nsa contractor edward snowden, who is now hold up in russia, but the hits keep coming from him. the diplomatic impact kicked up an order of magnitude, though, over reports from the german paper that german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone, her cell phone, had also been bugged by the nsa after a direct, and i'm guessing kind of brusk call between the chancellor and president obama, the white house released a statement saying that the president "assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of chancellor merkel." is not and will not in the future. those are the key phrases here.
.s. news about nsa spying on its allies. did you know that was being done. >> guest: europe in s foreign country. we collect foreign intelligence. in best interest, from national security standpoint and other interests as well. as you heard keith alexander say, much of that data collection has been used to help avert props in europe that might have effort wise happened. so our allies ben from the collection we do and that is important national security issue, that we do collect foreign intelligence. host host chairman diane fines stein, democrat fromce californ, said yesterday that the intelligence panel has been left in the dark about a program that has been occurring over the last decade. >> guest: i don't know what goes on in senate intelligence. i know what goes on in the house intelligence. we have keith alexander up often what is going on in the intelligence activities, data collection. c cia is up there often to do the oversight responsibility. i don't feel that april in the house side, i don't know what goes on in the senate. >> host: you were briefed as a we were spying on u.s.
the accountability on the nsa spying issue. here's peter baker's headline. post, bye washington scott wilson, controversies show how obama's inattention to detail may hurt his presidential legacy. we want to get your thoughts on this. republicans, (202) 585-3881. democrats, (202) 585-3880. independents, (202) 585-3882. tweet, @cspanwj. you can also post your comments on facebook or e-mail us. on both fronts on the nsa and the health care law, president obama's! down to this -- i did not know. no president can be aware of everything going on in a sprawling government that he theoretically manage. -- theoretically manages. this constant questions about how much in charge he really is. days, the president's health and human services secretary said that the -- that despite internal concerns in a mr. obama wasn, not told about serious problems with the new row graham's website until it was rolled out this month. said theicials president was not aware that the national security agency was tapping the phone of agngela merkel. opposition lawmakers and pundits have seized on the white house explanat
about. what i want to talk about is the fact that the nsa surveillance has been going on further than the bush era. it's been going back to late jay edgar hoover when the eavesdrop on martin luther king jr. and they blackmailed him. i think it's kind of like synonymous with what's going on with mark kell. i was wondering if he could speak i'm not. thank you. >> guest: i don't know what your question is. but the nsa which didn't exist until 1952 by the way, the nsa has, according to the revelations of that we are now seeing from edward snowden has gone on to what anyone realize beyond the wiretapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i'm a terrorist and just that i would let you know we are going to blow up a building. doesn't sound very likely that they should be doing that. at least that's my opinion. >> host: what do you make of the revolution's overall but the work the nsa is doing and how that either helps or contributes to what the work at the fbi and the cia do? >> guest: well, the fbi is an important agency obviou
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
.s. spying on spain, nsa eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel's cell phone. for more than a decade, the white house claims, without president obama's knowledge. >>> u.s. ambassador to spain called on the carpet in madrid. today on capitol hill european union officials demanded answers from chairman of the house intelligence committee. >> i think confidence is damaged. we've identified some questions. therefore, we are -- have to work hard that confidence is established. >> what does this all mean for president obama's relationships with world leaders going forward. on six minute top cia officials talks about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems.
'll have a fair and balanced debate coming up. >>> and the blame game over the nsa surveillance program. who the agency's chief says is really responsible for all the recent scandals. >>> plus, how the unemployment rate is having a major impact, get this, on our beer industry. ♪ hmm. ♪ mm-hmm. [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now -- but hurry, the offer ends soon. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 glk350 for $419 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. tomato florentine soup, it took a little time to get it just right. [ ding ] ♪ but finally, it happened. perfection. at progresso, we've got a passion for quality, because you've got a passion for taste. at progresso, we've got a passion for quality, when you do what io, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum votility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 1
. that is not what i wanted to talk about. i want to talk about the fact that the nsa surveillance has been going on further than the bush era. it is been going back to j edgar hoover when they eavesdrop on martin luther king, jr. and they blackmailed him. i was wondering if you could speak on that. thank you. guest: i do not know what your question is, exactly, but the nsa, which did not exist until 1952 -- the nsa has gone beyond what anyone realized. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i am a terrorist, i thought you would i thought i would let you know that we are going to blow up a building. host: we make of the revelations overall of the work that the nsa is doing -- what do you make of the revelations overall of what the work that the nsa is doing? guest: the nsa is an important agency. it seems they have gone beyond what anyone suspected they could be doing. i do not think their collection of metadata is not over her, but logged. -- not overheard, but logged. that seems to be going beyond what is necessary. if they have a bad guy, they can put in for a warrant. they
and landscapers. you can find it all on angie's list. join today. >>> new spying details reveal the nsa has tapped the phones of up to 35 world leaders. the question become, do the benefits of surveillance outweigh the risk of damaging relations with our international partners? let a let's listen to robert gibbs and peter king offer their competing views. >> i think clearly damage has been done. i think we have to evaluate whether the costs of it is method of gathering some intelligence greatly exceeds the benefit of that intelligence, particularly when we're listening in to apparently some of our very closest allies. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives. in france and germany and throughout europe. we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> you begged me to go first. >> did you have to say that? >> yes. >> okay. i'm going to just say, my experience, i was in the white house, we were doing this back in the 70s and 80s.
in scandal and failure. and moody's chief economist john lonski is joining us, and nsa wiretapping program, allegedly spreading from 35 world leaders to the fellow in the center. one of the world's most reported sir irespectspiritual voices. and dodgadministration trying tk as well further investigation of benghazi, we'll told you how, next. stay with us. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the w
intelligence services and not collected by the nsa. >> that could complicate the situation for several foreign leaders who have criticized the obama programs and recent disclose years about spying were meant a to shame america's top spy, it didn't work. here's nbc's andrea mitchell. >> reporter: under fiemp frre fe moment they walked in, they were protesting about spying. but america's spy agencies were not apologizing to anyone, claiming, instead, all countries spy. >> some of this remind me of the classic movie "casablanca," my god, there is gambling going on here, it's the same kind of thing. >> do you believe the alloys have conducted at any time -- allies have conducted at any time spying on us or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> reporter: they don'ted reports of mass phone records on millions of people in spain and france. france's president and germany and more than 30 leaders in all, an invasion of privacy the u.s. has not denied. what the administration will not explain is how president obama did not know as the white house claims. >> if the president didn't know, he certainly should have
everybody. i think it's because of nsa surveillance. i think it's because of syria and the problems related to that. i think when you put all of these things together, people are looking at the president and saying you know, you're not fixing the problems. >> i think one of the problems, too, has been something the republicans have pushed and pushed it subtly for once, and that is the whole idea that he didn't know anything about anything. republicans have put that, you know, you bring up benghazi, what did you know, when did you know it, you bring up did he understand what was going on with the website. well, no, he really didn't know it. so did he know we were spying on our closest friends, well, no, the president didn't know that. i think it gives people this uneasy sense. we're already in uneasy times economically. obama care just superimposes itself over that and people thinking something that we talk about at my kitchen table is changing here, and that's important. it's not some place far away. it's right here. then you add on top of that the sort of president that republicans say is
the military death benefits being held back. a story we're going to cover in a little bit, nsa listening to world leader phone calls, didn't know about that. is it possible or conceivable that president obama could be out of the loop on some of these big item sns. >> it's conceivable to me he could be out of the loop on any one of them. but it's hard to believe he wouldn't have known about any of them, any of these ones they said he didn't know about. we've been given to believe this is a very bright, very curious man who cares about policy details, grasps without difficulty and asks without questions. the picture that emerges from the array of things he was not in the loop on was a more disengaged president leaving it all to others. in which case it's imperative that you pick good others. it's questionable whether he has. >> all right, brit. thank you. >>> the health care fiasco is playing a big role in the contest for governor. just how important that may be. >> hold back the tide of obama care. i need your vote on november 5th. >> crunch time in virginia's race for governor and republ
a yahoo! address and they passed it to the nsa, which went and started monitoring the e-mail address. as soon as the e-mail came in from the united states, to that address, the nsa passed it to both n.y.p.d. and officials in colorado. i have been in rapid succession. i think that is a good take away for coming in now, for cooperation post-9/11, the real good cooperation does work frankly, thetraditional pic rankly the traditional police work for amed work for the fbi for so many decades that have kind of come under scrutiny and maybe people think don't work to fight terrorism like lady maranda lights are questioning them over a long period of time, watching and waiting. those kinds of things in the end, does work. and you know, we didn't need secret presents. we didn't need waterboarding. we didn't need guantÁnamo bay. collaboration and smart policing work to keep america safe. >> host: how are you able to get access to these records? >> guest: adam goldman, my co-author and i reported for "the associated press." for about 18 months through 2011 to early 2013, we were reporting on t
that german chancellor's phone was being listened into by the nsa the white house said the president didn't know about that. now that we've seen all the testing of the affordable care act computer system that crashed before october 1, the white house says the president didn't know any of that was happening. how does the president not know about these things? >> there is so much information that comes into the white house. and it seems as this continues to role out that very few people knew, if anyone knew the breadth of this challenge. and so, so why would you not bring it to the president? well, if the white house staff really didn't know how bad it was, and my sense is that's probably the case, then you wouldn't say to the president, oh, we think this is screwed up. >> pelley: what point does the president say this is the most important thing my administration has ever done, we're going roll this computer system out on october 1. this better go well. >> the biggest challenge in any white house is the myriad of issues and the numbers that come before you. so-- it doesn't surprise me that
congress, the american congress. snowden, whose nsa leaks are still rattling cages met with a german lawmaker in moscow. fred pleitgen is in germany with more. >> reporter: hi, carol. i have the letter, it's interesting because it doesn't mention germany by name. the operative part of this letter says "i hope when the difficulties of this humanitarian situation" meaning the limbo he's in, in russia "have been resolved and i will be able to cooperate in the responsible finding of fact regarding the reports in the media" that of course pertains to the documents behind a lot of the media reports regarding the nsa for instance spying on the german chancellor but a lot of other things disclosed recently and from that and from his talks with edward snoweden this german lawmakers discerns that snowden would be able to travel to germany to testify in front of german parliament about the leaks coming out or perhaps stay in russia and have members of german parliament come there. there are a lot of hurdles. one of the things that snowden apparently also wants is to be assured he will not be de
the nsa leaker has been hired by a russian website to perform maintenance. he was granted a year-long asylum. >>> a victory for the new york police department. a judge ruled. nypd can resume the controversial stop and frisk policy while other appeals are heard. opponents say it unlawfully targets african americans and latinos. >>> the fda reports 12% of spices imported into the u.s. are contaminated with bug parts, rodent hairs and other unappetizing materials. the report notes that 7% of spices tested were contaminated with salmonella. >> see, that's why i eat bland food, no spices. >> good thing, i may, too. >> i may do that because i'm boring. >> thanks very much. >>> up next, a super tunnel, fascinating, a massive under ground passage way used to smuggle drugs. we'll take you inside this tunnel. vo: it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open en
kerry says that the nsa spying on u.s. allies went too far. kerry telling an open government conference in london this week that some activities have been happening on what he calls automatic pilot without obama administration officials knowing about it. >>> scott carpenter is being remembered by family and friends at a funeral service in colorado. he died last month at the age of 88 from complications following a stroke. he was the second american to orbit the earth following john glenn's historic ride who will speak at the funeral. >>> time to fall back everybody. at 2:00 a.m., it's officially daylight saving time and end to that. set your clocks back one hour and enjoy that extra hour of sleep. that's a quick look at some of the stories making news right now. >>> well, one of the world's most wanted terrorists now dead, killed in a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. taliban leader. hakimullah mehsud. his death represents one of the highest level counterterrorism victories since the death of osama bin laden. joining us with his thoughts on what this could mean for the war on terror, we ha
's privacy and civil liberties oversight board public meeting to discuss changes to the nsa's data selection. you can watch a morning session live on c-span two at 9:15. >> i'm surrounded by just a few of the items that kept getting on the 10 best dressed list of the first lady. is the outfit she wore to the formal opening of the saint lawrence seaway. another custom-designed dress is this that was referred to as the -- as the twyla tuille. she was very fond of the color pink and wore it in many different shades and styles. jackie kennedy is well known for the little black dress and here are two examples of mimi's favorite little black dress. many always said she would never dressed like an old lady. these gowns that you were well into her 70s and 80s show her love of bright colors and wild fabrics. >> first lady mimi eisenhower tonight live at c-span at c- span3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. on "washington mr. hoagland examines the budget talks on capitol hill and whether another fight over government funding and the debt ceiling can be avoided. series on the afford will health car
short time. things such as the nsa penetration of google and facebook could dramatically impact apple stock -- i'm sorry, google stock. inould be very interested your comment as to whether you think it will impact apple anywhere nearly as much as it impacts google. guest: google is worth more than microsoft. has disrupted my industry, magazine publishing trade has disrupted advertising -- publishing. has disrupted advertising. google owns youtube, where a lot of original content creation has moved to. the market is telling you it is more relevant than microsoft, previously the world cost most valuable company. -- world's most valuable company. not making any call. that is what the market is saying. this is a company that no one in the year 2000 had heard of. apple, there is that old line that the president had. there is an apple device in everybody's hands. i have several at home. you see college students having them. is single-blet handedly killing the pc industry. this is the world's most valuable company by market capitalization, and yet it is not in the world's most quoted stock m
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
and i attended probably 50 to 100 meetings at nsa headquarter at langly at fbi headquarter where all of the attorneys and all the leadership of the criminal programs and intel programs got together and trying to figure out under what circumstance could we work together? how could we share information and gain assistance from the intel community without cardiovascularring them and forming the secret alliance that was not required. now, later the fbi indicted the organization dismanhattan th -- dismantled them. he was trying to perpetrate $150 million fraud on nasdaq. we prevented that. we did a great deal of good in the case. everything was going just wonderfully until -- it wasn't even the defense attorneys, it was doj attorneys going prosecute and oversee the prosecution and show up and say, hi, cia, open your books. we want to see what help you gave the fbi. sources and methods. well, their welcome was soon wornout when they did that. rightfully so. you have two competing interest in the system. a right of a defendant know what the government did to him or her and why. and how and
-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program in a house committee. -- kelley,elly author of biographies. .nd american history tv remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of the assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> president obama met with iraqi prime minister to talk about the partition between the u.s. and iraq. he addressed the syrian civil war and iran's nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes. >> all set? all set? i want to welcome back prime minister maliki to the white house. it's been two years since the last u.s. troops left from iraq, but the strategic partnership between our two countries remains very strong. we honor the lives that were lost, both american and iraqi, to bring about a functioning democracy in a country that previously had been ruled by a vicious dictator. and we appreciate prime minister maliki's commitment to honoring that sacrifice by ensuring a strong, prosperous, inclusive and democratic iraq. >> [speaker translates] >> we had a wide-ranging discussion about economic issues, regional issues, and security issues. [speaker tr
.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies like nsa is outside the u.s. and is not governed by statutes. it is governed by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those guidelines provide any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated -- and he is right -- we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and our allies safe and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. simply because we can do certain things does not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what are the benefits we are receiving and what are the protections we are generating against the privacy that we necessarily have to give
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)